5 Reasons to Eat Seasonally

5 Reasons to Eat With The Seasons

While I have always been a lover of good food, it wasn’t until college that I really became aware of the many issues surrounding the food industry and tried to make positive changes in my own life. One of the first changes I decided to make was really making a conscious effort to eat with the seasons- which, doing my undergrad in South Florida, wasn’t actually all that difficult. It wasn’t until I moved back up north three years ago that I really learned just how important eating with the seasons can be!

The basic premise is this: rather than going to your supermarket and picking up whatever produce you desire on a certain day, you learn what is already growing in your region during that time of year and stick to those items instead- better yet, get them straight from the local farmer! Given that the produce is able to be grown locally, chances are that the food will have travelled less of a distance, be grown to better standards (hopefully organically), and the chances of corruption or unfair business practices are far less than buying out of season produce.

Follow me over to the BULK HERB STORE BLOG to read my top 5 reasons to eat with the seasons!

Great selection of bulk herbs, books, and remedies. Articles, Research Aids and much more.

The ‘Bunny Spice’ Smoothie

Are you in the full-on winter blues yet? I am. One of the really cool things I’ve learned about creation and food is how the Lord really has equipped us to take care of ourselves by eating seasonal foods. It’s no coincidence that things like citrus, pumpkins, and carrots all come into season in late fall, and are full of the Vitamin C and Beta Carotene we need to support our immune systems through the winter!

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This smoothie is one that I adapted from a great book, Raw Food Real World- though they use fresh almond milk instead of yogurt. Either way, it’s a great one for the fall and winter, when we should be consuming as many ‘orange’ foods as possible- boosting our immune systems and restoring the vitamins that we often lose without the abundance of fresh produce that summer provides. Play around with this recipe until you find what suits your tastes- some people prefer to highlight the sweetness of the carrot, others the spice of the ginger. Make it yours!

1 cup fresh carrot juice (or from a health food brand, like Knudsen’s)

Fresh juice from a 1-inch ginger knob, or 2 teaspoons powdered ginger

1 banana

2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice or a blend of cinnamon and nutmeg

1 6-oz container vanilla yogurt

OPTIONAL: ice

Combine everything in a blender and serve! Some people prefer this one thickened up with some ice- I can take it or leave it. I like to sprinkle some pumpkin pie spice on top as a finishing touch. Using fresh juices in this one really makes a difference, so pull out that juicer if you have it- but store-bought juices are a fine substitution as well. Enjoy, little bunnies!

WATCH THIS: No Impact Man

One of the very first documentaries I viewed after getting Netflix a few years back was No Impact Man.  Recommended to me at work by a fellow health nut, I was surprised and challenged by this family’s brave quest.

The premise of the documentary (and corresponding book of the same title) is that the Beavan family (husband, wife, and child) attempt to live with no environmental impact for an entire year- while residing in the middle of Manhattan.  Many challenges arise, from transportation (bikes become a favorite) to food sourcing (how can you eat locally?) to what to do about toilet paper (do they ever answer that one?).

The participants are very honest about their feelings during the experiment, and how it affects them in life afterwards as well.  It’s quite entertaining to see the whole family stomping laundry in the tub, or experimenting with ancient preservation techniques in lieu of a refrigerator.  They even go to visit the farms (just outside of NYC) where most of their food was coming from.   There is great dialogue interspersed about different industries (dairy and “organics” being two big ones) that may change the way you think about things, too.  This film changed that way I view “antibiotic free” labeling.

While I know that not everyone can live like this family, I love that they inspired little changes in my life, and caused me to question what I could do differently to lessen my environmental impact.  After seeing this, Matt and I started walking to the grocery store when we could, and using cut up old tees instead of paper towels for small messes.  We also made use of power strips so that we can turn off unnecessary electronics when we are gone for an extended time.  We might not live without refrigeration, but we certainly were moved to make changes where we could.  If you have a free night, I highly suggest watching this film- you wont regret it!

Lessening impact alongside you this weekend,

Karli

Thoughts on Global vs. Local Trade

I have an inner dilemma that I have been battling for a while now: the question of whether to support global economies or focus on local economies. Brands like American Apparel have brought “made in the USA” to the forefront of our shopping brains, particularly in a season when sweatshops and child labor run rampant in most parts of the world. But shouldn’t we try to provide for our brothers and sisters overseas if we can, too?

This debate reached a head for me when I discovered that a shirt that my organization sells is manufactured in Haiti. My initial reaction was negative- we have been active in Haiti and have seen the conditions of work there, and the thought of promoting those environments sickened me. When I raised my concern, however, I was gently reminded that the company that we work with was committed to high ethical standards and that, because the shirts were made in Haiti, we were providing jobs and income to those people that we love, and helping their economy in perhaps the only way we could from a distance. My mind was eased.

My thoughts are further compounded when it comes to food- while I love eating with the seasons, purchasing local foods, and building relationships with farmers and craftsmen, I also really appreciate many foods that don’t grow locally and items that are manufactured in other parts of the company, or even the world. Things like coffee, chocolate, spices, and tea are cultivated well in certain parts of the world that I just don’t live in. As a responsible consumer, do I forgo these things, therefore saving carbon emissions due to shipping and dedicate myself to eating what my local community has to offer, or do I support these global markets, while perhaps putting the global economy on the back burner?

I don’t know what the answer is, but here are a few things that I am confident in:

-If you can buy something local, do it. Especially when it comes to food. Local farmers and culinary artisans depend on their local economy because, for the most part, they can’t export. Plus, you are getting a better quality food that you can be confident in- less preservatives, easier to check on gardening and farming operations, and good relationships with the people you are buying from.

-Fair trade is a beautiful thing. If you can’t get something locally, fair trade is a great way to ensure that your purchase from the global economy is something that you can be confident is building up global individuals and not causing any injustice along the way. There are many fair trade stores popping up now, such as the 10,000 Villages network, that make fair trade shopping feel like a breeze.

-Sweat shops are terrible. If you can’t guarantee that an item you are buying was made without blood on someone’s hands, you just shouldn’t buy it- at least not with a clear conscience. At times, this requires research not only into a store, but also a specific brand- but it is well worth it to know that you are using your money responsibly, and not to cause injustice.

-If there isn’t a good alternative, try making your own. This is especially helpful when it come to things that are really hard to research, such as cleaning products or cosmetics. There are so many ingredients in these items that its hard to say with confidence if a product is manufactured and sourced responsibly. However, there are countless way to replicate these items at home, where you can source the items yourself and be confident n the products you are using.

-Support your friends. Why buy a grocery store card made in who-knows-where when you have a friend that makes them for a living? Why buy a headband at Target when your friend is upcycling pieces and selling them on Etsy? Maybe you have friends that are photographers, or event planners, coffee roasters, stuffed animal makers, or jewelry designers. Show them love, and be loved in return.

-It is better to bow out of an economy than to stimulate a unjust one for lack of a better option. Thrift stores provide a way to purchase (many times with proceeds to a good cause) without giving any money back to the manufacturers. This can be a great place to find things that are difficult to source well, such as shoes, dressy clothes, or furniture.

While I wish that the answers were more cut and dry, I recognize that these thoughts are just part of the journey in being a Christlike consumer, and I certainly have not arrived at full understanding yet. We have to educate ourselves in order to use our money well- each dollar is a tool we are given to build the Kingdom, and we must take that seriously.